HB1738 Changes certain stealing laws.
Sponsor: Richardson, Mark L. (154) Effective Date:00/00/0000
CoSponsor: LR Number: 3949L.01I
Last Action: COMMITTEE: CRIMINAL LAW
03/01/2000 - Public Hearing Held (H)
HB1738
Next Hearing:Hearing not scheduled
Calendar:Bill currently not on calendar
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BILL SUMMARIES

INTRODUCED

HB 1738 -- Stolen Property

Sponsor:  Richardson

This bill makes several changes to provisions regarding the sale
of goods and stolen property.  The bill:

(1)  Requires itinerant vendors and peddlers to show receipts to
law enforcement officers for new and unused property being
sold.  "New and unused property" is defined as property that has
not been used and is still in its original packaging (Sections
150.465, 570.010);

(2)  Allows to be admissible as evidence of intent to steal the
possession, use, transfer, or reproduction, of a sales receipt,
tag, or universal price code (Section 570.030);

(3)  Makes stealing a class A misdemeanor if the property or
services are worth less than $150, a class D felony for property
or services worth at least $150 but less than $425, and a class
C felony if the value is $425 or more.  Currently, stealing is a
class A misdemeanor for property valued less than $750, and a
class D felony for property worth $750 or more (Section 570.030);

(4)  Makes receiving stolen property a class A misdemeanor if
the property is valued at less than $150, and a class D felony
if it is worth at least $150 but not more than $425.  The bill
makes receiving stolen property a class C felony if the property
is valued at $425 or more, or if the person receiving the
property is a dealer in goods of the type in question.
Currently, receiving stole property worth less than $150 is a
class A misdemeanor, and a class C felony for property worth
$150 or more (Section 570.080);

(5)  Expands the definition of forgery to include the making of
receipts and universal product codes, and the knowing use or
transfer of forged receipts and universal product codes (Section
570.090); and

(6)  Requires prosecuting and circuit attorneys to collect the
face amount of a dishonored check and a service fee from the
issuer.  Currently, these actions are discretionary.  The bill
also adds to the remedies available for dishonored checks to
allow individuals, their agents or assignees, or holders, to
initiate action against the issuer of the check when the matter
is not referred to the prosecuting or circuit attorney.  The
bill defines that a "reasonable service charge" is not to exceed
$30, and the amount charged by the bank for the dishonored check
may also be recovered.  Currently, only an individual may
collect the face value of the check and the service fee (Section
570.090).


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Last Updated October 5, 2000 at 11:34 am