HB43 - POLITICAL ACTIVITIES OF STATE EMPLOYEES - Hosmer, Craig
HB43 REMOVES CERTAIN RESTRICTIONS ON POLITICALLY ACTIVE INDIVIDUALS' APPOINTMENT TO STATE MERIT POSITIONS.
Sponsor: Hosmer, Craig (138) Effective Date:00/00/00
CoSponsor:Gratz, William (Bill) (113) LR Number:0133-01
Last Action: COMMITTEE: LABOR
HCS HB 43
Next Hearing:Hearing not scheduled
Calendar:Bill currently not on calendar
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Available Bill Summaries for HB43
| Committee | Introduced |


Available Bill Text for HB43
| Committee | Introduced |

Available Fiscal Notes for HB43
| House Committee Substitute | Introduced |

BILL SUMMARIES

COMMITTEE

HCS HB 43 -- POLITICAL ACTIVITIES OF STATE EMPLOYEES

SPONSOR:  Hickey (Hosmer)

COMMITTEE ACTION:  Voted "do pass" by the Committee on Labor by
a vote of 15 to 9.

This bill repeals the prohibition on a merit system state
employee:  (1) being a member of any national, state or local
committee of a political party or an officer of a partisan
political club; and (2) taking part in the management or affairs
of any political party or any partisan political campaign.

The bill also prohibits any individual holding an appointive
position in an executive agency from:  (1)  using his or her
official authority to influence the results of an election; (2)
soliciting non-voluntary political contributions from
subordinates; (3) running for a political office as the
representative of a political party; and (4) soliciting or
discouraging any person's participation in political activity
when that person has any official business with the individual's
agency.  The individual may engage in other political
activities, except: (1) while on duty; (2) in any building
occupied in the discharge of official duties; (3) while wearing
a uniform or insignia identifying the office or position of the
individual; and (4) when using a state vehicle.

The bill makes it a class 3 election offense to coerce any
appointed agency official into engaging in, or refraining from,
political activity.  This offense is punishable by a fine of up
to $2,500 and up to a year in jail.

FISCAL NOTE:  Not available at time of printing.

PROPONENTS:  Supporters say that this bill is the state's
version of the federal law known as the Hatch Act.  It simply
guarantees that government employees have the right to
participate in the electoral process, just like everyone else.

Testifying for the bill were Representative Hosmer; and Missouri
AFL-CIO.

OPPONENTS:  There was no opposition voiced to the committee.

Richard Smreker, Research Analyst


INTRODUCED

HB 43 -- State Employee Political Activities

Co-Sponsors:  Hosmer, Gratz

This bill repeals the prohibition on a merit system state
employee:  (1) being a member of any national, state or local
committee of a political party or an officer of a partisan
political club; and (2) taking part in the management or affairs
of any political party or any partisan political campaign.

The bill also prohibits any individual holding an appointive
position in an executive agency from:  (1)  using his or her
official authority to influence the results of an election; (2)
soliciting non-voluntary political contributions from
subordinates; (3) running for a political office as the
representative of a political party; and (4) soliciting or
discouraging any person's participation in political activity
when that person has any official business with the individual's
agency.  The individual may engage in other political
activities, except: (1) while on duty; (2) in any building
occupied in the discharge of official duties; (3) while wearing
a uniform or insignia identifying the office or position of the
individual; and (4) when using a state vehicle.

The bill makes it a class 3 election offense to coerce any
appointed agency official into engaging in, or refraining from,
political activity.  This offense is punishable by a fine of up
to $2,500 and up to a year in jail.


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Last Updated August 11, 1997 at 4:04 pm